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                                   MEMORANDUM  


                        To:

All Licensed Day Care Providers, Day Care Homes, Group Day Care Homes and Day Care Centers.

                         From:

DCFS Day Care Licensing Advisory Council

                         CC:

George Vennikandam


                         Date:

March 14, 2017

Re:  Important Information about Water Testing

In recent weeks, you may have received a flyer in the mail, or have been contacted by companies or individuals offering to test your drinking water for lead.  The letters may have stated that Illinois law now requires that licensed day care centers, day care homes and group day care homes are required to test their drinking water for lead by the end of 2017.   Please be advised that this information is inaccurate

Section 225 ILCS 10/5.9 specifically states:


    Sec. 5.9. Lead testing of water in licensed day care centers, day care homes and group day care homes.

 (a) On or before January 1, 2018, the Department, in consultation with the Department of Public Health, shall adopt rules that prescribe the procedures and standards to be used by the Department in assessing levels of lead in water in licensed day care centers, day care homes, and group day care homes constructed on or before January 1, 2000 that serve children under the age of 6. Such rules shall, at a minimum, include provisions regarding testing parameters, the notification of sampling results, training requirements for lead exposure and mitigation.

(b) After adoption of the rules required by subsection (a), and as part of an initial application or application for renewal of a license for day care centers, day care homes, and group day care homes, the Department shall require proof that the applicant has complied with all such rules.


DCFS is currently working with the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) to determine how best to adopt rules and procedures to be used by the Department in assessing levels of lead in water in licensed day care centers, day care homes, and group day care homes constructed on or before January 1, 2000 that serve children under the age of 6.  At this time DCFS has not yet finalized such rules and procedures. 

DCFS Day Care Licensing will notify you in writing once we have determined any applicable changes to our policies and procedures regarding assessing levels of lead in water in licensed day care centers, day care homes, and group day care homes constructed on or before January 1, 2000 that serve children under the age of 6.   If you have any questions and or concerns regarding such matters please do not hesitate to contact your DCFS day care licensing representative or DCFS Day Care Licensing at DCFS.DayCareLicensing@illinois.gov

100 W. Randolph St., Ste 6-100, Chicago, IL 60601    www.DCFS.Illinois.gov       312.814.6800


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MEMORANDUM

TO: Illinois Department of Children and Family Services/Day Care Facilities

FROM: IDPH Communicable Disease Section

DATE: March 3, 2017

SUBJECT: I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter Recall

I. BACKGROUND

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) has been notified of a cluster of      E. coli O157 cases in five other states possibly linked to consumption of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter or related products. Due to the serious nature of E. coli O157 infection in children, we are notifying health care providers, laboratories, and day cares about the possibility of cases arising from consumption of this product. The product is produced in other states and is available in a wide array stores as well as online. There is also evidence that this product may be served in day care facilities. At this time, there are no known cases in Illinois associated with this cluster.

II.REQUESTED ACTION

IDPH is asking day care facilities to determine whether they have I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter or related products. If the day care has any of these products, they should not be served. Rather, they should be kept in case testing of the product is needed. Day cares suspecting possible illness due to consumption of soy nut butter should contact their local health department.

A list of local health departments can be found online at http://www.idph.state.il.us/local/alpha.htm.

III.CLINICAL SYMPTOMS

Symptoms of E. coli O157 vary but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. People typically develop symptoms in 3-4 days after ingesting the effected product, but it could be as short as one day or as long as 10. Most people show signs of recovery within 5-7 days. Occasionally, individuals can develop the severe complication of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which causes renal failure. If a child in your care has diarrhea that lasts for more than three days, or is accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool or profuse vomiting that prevents them from keeping liquids down and causes them to pass very little urine, contact their health provider.

People who have E. coli O157-like symptoms should see a health care provider and not take antibiotics or antidiarrheal medications, as these could increase the risk of HUS.

Should you have any further questions or concerns about E. coli O157, please contact your local health department.

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Influenza, commonly called "the flu," is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by the influenza virus. Compared with most viral respiratory infections such as the common cold, influenza infection often causes a more severe illness. Typical influenza illness includes fever (usually 100° F to 103° F in adults and often even higher in children); respiratory symptoms such as cough, sore throat and a runny or stuffy nose; headaches, muscle aches and extreme fatigue. Although nausea, vomiting and diarrhea can sometimes accompany influenza infection, especially in children, these symptoms are rarely the primary symptoms. The term "stomach flu" is a misnomer that is sometimes used to describe gastrointestinal illnesses caused by organisms other than influenza viruses.

Most people who get the flu recover completely in one to two weeks, but some people develop serious and potentially life-threatening medical complications, such as pneumonia. Over the past decade, influenza and pneumonia have been associated with an average of 3,500 deaths a year in Illinois. During most flu seasons, which typically run from October through May, between 10 percent and 20 percent of the population is infected with influenza viruses. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications each year in the U.S.

Both the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend everyone six months of age and older receive the flu vaccine. People at high risk of serious flu complications, including young children; pregnant women; people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease; and people 65 years and older should make getting vaccinated a priority.

To reduce the spread of influenza, it is also important to practice the 3 C’s:

  • Clean: Wash your hands frequently
  • Cover: Cover your cough and sneeze
  • Contain: Contain your germs by staying home if you are sick

Visit the IDPH Seasonal Influenza webpage for more information about the flu, symptoms, what to do if you get sick and an interactive map you can use to find a health care provider near you offering flu shots.

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